Good, Evil and Stuck

Doctor Thomas H. Hightower the Third is a new character in a new series. He’s a secretive man who has a very troubled past and is engaged in an epic battle with evil. Evil in the form of one monstrous person Trevor Boxer. The man who killed Hightower’s wife.

To the world Hightower appears to be a semi-retired attorney who has odd ways and takes on occasional cases that peak his curiosity. Living a reclusive life in the Denver foothills would make him eccentric; but not all that unusual—but he is very unusual.

The first book in the series, Case of the False Prophet (debating title –it may change), is progressing rather slowly from idea to book. This process should probably be best hidden. Better from a reader point of view to think of a book as a burst of inspiration that leads to a few months of frantic writing and viola; a completed manuscript. None of my books have been like that. Some have been smoother than others, but all have had periods of mental challenges.

I’ve read about authors who have worked on a single book for years, even decades; I can’t imagine. While I’m writing a book it never leaves me, I’m always thinking about the story; where it’s going or maybe not going. Every day, even when I’m not able to actually write, it stays there—churning away, trying to reach the conclusion. Going through that mental process for years would be painful. I know because it happened to me.

I got stuck. Some call this malady, writer’s block. It was Four Corners War, my next book scheduled to be released in a few months. I started FCW in early 2016. Quickly wrote about a third of the book and then I hit a wall. At that point I had written and published three books in about a year’s time. I expected to finish FCW in three to four months. It didn’t happen. I got stuck and couldn’t move. For over a year I didn’t write one word. Eventually, I took on another project, Murder So Wrong, with a co-author and left FCW hanging.

During this period, I wrote three Muckraker books and three Vincent Malone books, but FCW was always there; waiting. The story never left my mind. Once whatever was causing the block went away, I quickly finished FCW.

Most likely the block was due to holes in the plot. I write mysteries and have a bad habit of starting books before I know the complete story. I trust myself to be able to develop the total plot of a book while I’m writing. I have a broad idea about the story and the characters but expect some things to change as I write. That approach has worked for me—but no doubt it was that lack of planning that caused FCW to stop. I reached a point where I had created plot lines that no longer felt like they were connected and did not have a good way to end the mess I had created. So I was stuck.

To get unstuck, I walked away. But it was more than that—I wrote other books. That process helped me build a better plot for FCW. I didn’t just come back to an unfinished book and complete it—I changed it. It was wrong, and I didn’t know how to fix it. The idea of the book and the problems stayed with me the entire time I was writing other books, and eventually, I knew what to do to complete Four Corners War.

If this all sounds a little chaotic or maybe even a bit unhinged—I think it was just that. This is no way to write a book. Do not do what I do. I admire the heck out of people who prepare detailed outlines, develop scene story boards, construct character lists with descriptions and backgrounds—wow, those people are real writers—that’s not me. I jump in with an idea and start creating that wonderful, exciting story on the fly. My creativity requires that I let the characters interact with the story in ways that would not have occurred to me at the beginning, would not have fit a preordained outline—in other words; loosy-goosy.

Of course, there is a problem with loosy-goosy; sometimes I get lost. That may be happening with Doctor Hightower or it could be a spell of creative thinking which will be followed by a period of creative writing. We’ll find out soon.


The audiobook for Santa Fe Mojo is still in the works. Due to lots of complications this project has taken a lot longer than expected but is now getting close. It has only been recently that I was able to listen to a portion of the book. I liked all of the elements of the audiobook, but it was strange to hear. I had never listened to anyone read one of my books before.

During the process of writing, editing, reviewing and reviewing again, I probably will read a book fifty times or more before it is finalized. To hear it read by someone else (a very good narrator, by the way) was strange. This may sound odd to you, but it was like the book had been private before but somehow now it was public. Remember this is a book that has thousands and thousands of copies distributed—obviously it’s not a secret. Hearing a book read is really a different experience than reading to yourself. The book that was in my head was private this audiobook is very public.


Want to thank everyone for reading the blog. My current schedule is to write a post about once a week. I also put out a newsletter once a month. The newsletter is a little bit more structured with recurring features. You can subscribe to both the newsletter and blog from links on this page.

Thanks for being a reader.

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tedcliftonbooks

Ted Clifton, award winning author, is currently writing in three mystery series—Pacheco & Chino Mystery series, the Muckraker Mystery series and the Vincent Malone series. Clifton’s focus is on strong character development with unusual backdrops. His books take place in Southwest settings with some of his stories happening in the 1960s, 1980s and current times. The settings are places Clifton has lived and knows well, giving great authenticity to his narratives. Clifton has received the IBPA Benjamin Franklin award and the CIPA EVVY award--twice. Today Clifton and his wife reside in Denver, Colorado, with frequent visits to one of their favorite destinations, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

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